Feast on The Dinner Project

This summer at the Bruns, we’ve created a new space called the Story Hub where we’re inviting audience members to share their stories. Shakespeare’s stories may be on stage, but your stories are invited to live alongside them through the interactive exhibits you’ll find in the Story Hub. Here you have the chance to share your answers to the prompts and learn more about your fellow audience members by reading theirs.

At every performance, you’re invited to take part in the Dinner Project, a season-long exploration of the ways our family conversations relate to the larger world. Inspired by Raisin in the Sun’s juxtaposition of one family’s struggles against the challenges of the world around them, this project imagines family dinners as the place where our private and public worlds intersect.  Not to mention that many of our audience members enjoy dinners together at the Bruns!

During Raisin In The Sun patrons responded to the question “What does your family talk about at the dinner table?” Check out some of our favorites below!

“Now that I’m home from school for a hot minute, I spend my free after-noons prepping gourmet dinners for my parents. At the table I’ll often brag about my methods. My parents love it.”

 “”Life, Books, Psychology, Politics, Food, Police Brutality, Education, Relationships, School to Prison Pipeline, Income -> lack of it, Money, Racism/Social Justice, Violence, Poverty, Values, War, Implicit Bias, People of Color”

“No cats on the table! Poor turnout for primary election. Is it time to hire a life planner? How does King Lear speak to us? Is there more wine?”

“New movies”

 Though the theme of The Dinner Project will be consistent throughout the season, the question and way of sharing will change. Visit The Story Hub during Comedy of Errors and contribute to our newest prompt: “Share a secret or surprise that someone revealed to you over dinner.” Maybe your story will be featured on our blog!

About the author: Regina Fields is a Triangle Lab intern and a local actress.

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Lorraine and You: “Raisin” then and now

As many patrons and reviewers have noted, one of the fascinating aspects of A Raisin in the Sun is how resonant it is today, despite how much our society and culture has changed. Even though we live in an era of increased civil rights, systemic racism still exists—if it didn’t, the play would feel more like a historical document, and less like a contemporary commentary.

Many patrons and students have been drawing these lines between then and now. If you read Amani Morrison’s program article “Then and Now,” you saw these two eras being threaded together.

In a previous blog post, we wrote about playwright Lorraine Hansberry’s peculiar list of “likes,” “dislikes,” and “dreams”:

On April 1, 1960, Hansberry scrawled on legal pad an offbeat list of things that she liked, hated, and wanted, with a final column for what she was “bored to death with.” The fragment is unique for the window it opens on her mind and disposition; it is both sad and funny, political and personal. “My homosexuality” appears twice, as a like and a hate; “racism,” “death,” “pain,” and “cramps” are all hates, along with “what has happened to Sydney Poitier” (who had starred in the first Broadway production of A Raisin in the Sun in 1959).

In that same post, we asked our patrons and fans to write their own list, reflecting on both personal and social struggles. What has changed for you in your life? What feels possible? What does not? When we reflect on these ideas–prominent themes in A Raisin in the Sun–we get a glimpse into the power of theater to reveal social struggle, history, and change.

Today, we’re posting some of the written responses we’ve gotten from our on-site Story Hub, adjacent to the cafe at the theater. As the project continues, we’ll post more of our patrons’ likes, dislikes and dreams.

 

Buy tickets for A Raisin in the Sun or learn more about the show.

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