Pulling Strings

Thomas Azar (Benvolio) reports from Romeo and Juliet tech:

Tech week: the time when the magic of theater is carefully, painstakingly constructed. All of the planning, all of the rehearsing… now we get to see how far we really have to go. It’s a long process—tech week can feel like tech month if things aren’t going well. The hours can be lengthy, especially if you work backstage instead of onstage. However, if all goes well, then the audience never sees the strings (and there are a lot of ‘em), and it all looks like magic.

I have to say, this tech week feels like it’s going well. Last night, we teched (yes, that is a verb in theater) the first half of the show, and I don’t think we stopped for single moment. That’s a big deal, especially considering the tech-heavy scenes like the dance (lots o’ lights and sound) and the fights (how thick should the blood be?). When we got to the end of our Act I, Alex (who’s playing Romeo) said, with the sound of enjoyment in his voice, “It feels like we’re actually running the show.”

Indeed it did, and it’s thanks in large part to the tireless efforts of the crew. Seriously, these guys and gals are some truly talented people, and they deserve a round of applause nightly for their work. This show, and indeed all shows, cannot be what it is without its crew. After the actors have left the theater at 12:30am, they’re still there, working on lights, sounds, props, etc., and planning the next day. Too cool, these folks, too cool.

So, tech week invariably means we’re nearing Opening Night. Previews start Wednesday (got your tickets?) so we as a cast get our first taste of how this thing flies in front of a real audience. If you’re planning on coming to see the show this week, might I suggest bringing a blanket? It’s been a little bit chilly out at the Bruns this past week. Of course, the weather could (and probably will) change nightly; that’s one string we have yet to be able to pull.

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